Tibetan prayer flags

Buy high quality eco-friendly Tibetan prayer flags

BUY YOUR PRAYER FLAGS HERE!

 

Tibetan prayer flags made of high quality cotton, ecological, for a long time (at least two years outdoors). The cotton used is a terry cotton (Terry Cotton), which naturally absorbs a large amount of water and therefore makes the prayer flag more weather resistant.

The prayer flags contain the images and prayers relating to: Guru Rinpoche, Green Tara, Shakyamuni Buddha, Sangye Menla (the Medicine Buddha) and Chenrezig. Thanks to the quality of the cotton, our prayer flags have a high quality colouring giving beautiful and bright colours.

 

Tibetan prayer flags made of high quality, environmentally friendly cotton for at least two years. These prayer flags represent the deities of Tibetan Buddhism.

The quality of the cotton also allows our prayer flags to benefit from a quality inking giving beautiful bright colours. The prayer flags represent images and prayers related to: Victory Mantra, White Tara, Guru Rinpoche, Green Tara and a Lungta (wind horse).

drapeaux à prières tibétains - déités

Tibetan prayer flags made of high quality cotton, ecological, for a long time (at least two years outdoors). The cotton used is a terry cotton (Terry Cotton) which naturally absorbs a large amount of water and therefore makes the prayer flag more weather resistant. These 8 AUSPICIOUS SYMBOLS flags are threaded on cotton and have the 8 auspicious symbols.

The quality of the cotton also allows our prayer flags to benefit from a quality inking giving beautiful bright colours.

 

Tibetan prayer flags made of high quality, environmentally friendly cotton for at least two years. These prayer flags are printed in the traditional way with the Lungtas - wind horses.

The quality of the cotton also allows our prayer flags to benefit from a quality inking giving beautiful bright colours.

Definition

Tibetan Buddhist prayer flags often float on top of long poles planted on hilltops or on top of large Buddhist monuments, such as stupas.

The five colours symbolize the 5 elements, or the 5 families of Buddhas and sacred formulas are inscribed on them, which the wind animates and carries to the gods. Each Tibetan prayer banner or flag has its own symbolic meaning, bringing peace, compassion, blessing and protection. Each Buddhist prayer or mantra also resonates with a special meaning.

The flags are made by printing, from xylographic blocks, mantras, prayers and auspicious symbols on small squares of cloth or on long strips of cotton canvas in the colours of the five Buddhas, so that once the flags are hoisted, these good wishes are carried to the four winds and touch the beings with the blessing of the prayer thus carried.

A dashing wind horse often appears in the centre of the flag. The wind horse carries on its saddle the magical jewel of the Chakravartin, which spreads peace, prosperity and harmony in all the countries it travels through. The horse's favourite element is the wind; its rapid gallop, mane and tail floating freely even in calm weather, calls the wind, which rises to meet it. The wind and the horse are both carriers of movement, the horse in its material form and the wind in its ethereal form. Prayers are carried by the wind and in Tibet the prayer flags are called Wind Horses or Lungta.

As reported on wikipedia, there are two kinds of prayer flags:

· the lungta, horses of the wind or horses of the breath: garlands of small fabric rectangles printed with different mantras or prayers. They often come in five colours: blue, white, red, green and yellow (or sometimes orange). They are considered lucky charms with the ability to ward off difficulties. Their name comes from the horse printed on most of them, a horse represented carrying the Three Jewels: the Buddha, the Dharma (his teachings) and the Sangha (the Buddhist community).

· the darchok: long fabric banners, hung from masts three to five metres high. These banners of various colours present sacred texts.

According to the Nyingma school, the meaning of colours is as follows (in order, with blue always at the top, towards the sky):

· blue: space (the celestial vault) (Akashpura),

· white: air (or wind, clouds) (Vayapur),

· red: the light (Agnipura),

· green: water (Nagpura),

· yellow (or orange): the earth (Vasupara).

In the other schools, the respective colours of the air and water are reversed but the order remains the same.

Making Tibetan Prayer Flags

If you think that the Tibetan prayer flag is made on a production line by very sophisticated machines, you are very, very far from reality!

Like most objects made in Nepal or India, everything is done in the traditional way by hand.

First of all, there is the initial engraving which is done on wooden shelves. The traditional Tibetan prayer flags are composed of illustrations and texts related to Tibetan Buddhism. These mantras and motifs are reproduced by hand on the tablets by experienced engravers. The quality prayer flags are printed on cotton which allows for better absorption of colour and black ink engraving. The engraved tablets are then used by Tibetans or Nepalese who, using black ink, print on the blank pennant the text and illustration that will make up the Tibetan prayer flag. After drying, the pennants are assembled in a predetermined colour order. Only the edges connected to the rope are sewn. The other edges are left as they are so that they degrade over time.

The Tibetan prayer flag is then ready to decorate our temples, gardens or interiors!

Feng Shui use of the Tibetan Prayer Flag

l Unlock and activate specific areas of your environment. The bright colors of the Tibetan prayer flag are a classic remedy for temporarily activating any area that needs more energy. Ideally, you would do this in the garden, as the prayer flags are activated by the wind. However, you can also have these prayer flags indoors if it suits your taste and interior decoration.

l Elevate the energy of your altar or spiritual practice area (yoga, meditation, etc.). Tibetan prayer flags naturally belong to a space where you want a concentration of supportive spiritual energy, and a domestic altar may be the best place to display prayer flags in your home.

l Boost the energy around your house by using the Tibetan prayer flag in your garden. This is a classic use of prayer flags, as well as other objects activated by the wind, such as colourful air sleeves, wind chimes, whirlpools, etc. The constant movement of colour and sound keeps the Chi, or energy, active and fresh, which is one of the main objectives of Feng Shui.

Tips

Traditionally, prayer flags are replaced by new ones every year during the Losar (Tibetan New Year) festivities.

It is a popular belief in Tibet that if flags are hung on unfavourable astrological dates, they can bring negative results as long as they fly. The best time to put up new prayer flags is in the morning on a sunny and windy day.

Pour 2020, les dates à éviter (jours défavorables) selon le calendrier tibétain (Sakya)
to hang new flags are:

· February: 7, 18

· March: 4, 16, 31

· April: 11, 27

· May: 8, 20, 23

· June: 15, 30

· July: 12, 27

· August: 7, 22

· September: 3, 15, 18, 29

· October: 12, 26

· November: 7, 21

· December: 4, 18, 30

Flags of various impressions

There are many patterns printed on Tibetan flags:

BUY YOUR PRAYER FLAGS HERE!